Words I am fond of, this week.

Redolent.
That stretch of beach was redolent of seaweed.
Vermillion.
Shades of vermillion reminded her of urban gardens in the summer.
Verdant.
Olympic National Park is lush and verdant.
Ubiquitous.
The ubiquitous grasslands marked the horizon.
Spasm.
In a spasm of misplaced confidence, she quit her day job.
Crispy.
She might have stayed up for a second all-nighter but she was feeling a bit crispy.
Resonant.
She liked his voice: deep, resonant, and smooth.

Posted in response to The Poetry of List-Making

Rule of thirds

Rule of thirds is a way of framing photos so that they are more pleasing to the eye. The idea is that if you break up the photo into thirds, the main lines of action should follow the divider lines. For example, if you take a photo of a person, don’t center them exactly in the frame; shift them to a focal point along the left or right divider lines. It is easier to demonstrate with a photo that doesn’t quite meet the standard. Mouseover the following images to see the grid lines:

The photo above doesn’t quite follow the rule of thirds. The stamen is too low and is also cropped off the picture. I would have loved to line this up better.

This photo is a better example of following the rule of thirds:

Here’s another photograph demonstrating rule of thirds:

The horizon is at the lower third divider; the owl is at the leftmost divider.

Rule of thirds is not an absolute rule but it is a great way to frame one’s photos. Let me know of your favorite “rule of third” photos! Posted in response to weekly photo challenge Frame

Procrastination

My biggest form of procrastination comes from websites: where to host them, how to design them, and how to finesse the code to be as pure as possible. None of this really helps me continue to write. It’s a fun process (I love web design) but inevitably I find myself at 2am wondering why my apache rewrites aren’t working or where my regular expresssions went wrong. What is your biggest form of procrastination?

Abandoned shed

I saw this funky abandoned shed during my road trip across the U.S. a few years back. It is located somewhere in the midwest. This whole farm was a tourist attraction; it was advertised as a bunch of dilapidated farm houses you could explore. I like how you can see the other structure off in the distance from within the forefront shed. I also like how the lines seem to point in a spiral outwards. Normally I like “rule of thirds” photos where the subject is not fully centered, but I think in this case having the entrance in the center of the photograph makes the most sense. The shed in the forefront is a frame in two meanings: a frame or structure made of wood, and a frame or viewport to the outside.

Posted in response to this week’s photo challenge, Frame.